Ana Bozicevic

ana-bozicevic-author-photoAna Božičević is the author of Stars of the Night Commute (Tarpaulin Sky Press), a 2010 Lambda Award Finalist for Lesbian Poetry; Rise in the Fall (Birds, LLC), a 2013 Lambda Award Winner;  and five chapbooks of poetry, most recently War on a Lunchbreak (Belladonna*, 2011). With Željko Mitić, Ana is the editor of The Day Lady Gaga Died: an Anthology of NYC Poetry of the 21st Century (in Serbian, Peti talas/The Fifth Wave, 2011). Her translations of Zvonko Karanović recently received a NYSCA grant.

Ana works and studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY, where she edits Diane di Prima’s lectures for Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative and helps run the Annual Chapbook Festival.

Visit Ana’s website at at www.anabozicevic.com.

Books by Ana Bozicevic

bozicevic-stars-coverStars of the Night Commute

Poetry
6″x8″, 84 pages, paperback
2009

$12 includes shipping in the U.S.
(vs. $14 + $3.99 elsewhere)

2010 Lambda Award Finalist for Lesbian Poetry

“Thought-provoking, inspired and unexpected. Highly recommended” (Heather Aimee O’Neil, After Ellen); “Though Božičević’s work does terrify, and so, by extension, is rightly ‘about’ terror . . . Stars is more accurately (and happily) about what an émigré does, heart and eyes intact and hungry for the redemptive and the beautiful, after having experienced all that is contrary to the love and kindness (that can be) human beings” (Nicole Mauro, Jacket); “Ana Božičević’s work is sort of animist—it’s either about silence or the racket of the world. How does she do it? Clicks the switch to say it’s silent & it’s happening then on a distant tiny stage…. In Ana’s work I watch ‘it’ vanish (all the time) & I trust it” (Eileen Myles); “Ana Božičević’s work is filled with a wild freedom, and reading it often reminds me of reading Wallace Stevens, in that you know absolutely anything can happen next but whatever it is, it will be perfect” (Franz Wright)

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Recommended (online) reading: Action Yes Issue #17

Co-edited by Carina Finn & Ji yoon Lee, with contributions by Johannes Göransson and Emily Hunt, Action Yes Issue #17 features poems by TSky Press chapbook author Emily Toder as well as poems by Zvonko Karanović, translated by TSky Press author Ana Božičević.

In addition: excerpts from required-reading-for-the-apocalypse, the authorless Ark Codex ±0, from Derek White’s Calamari Press; lyric possession by fave new Black Ocean poet Feng Sun Chen; and other voces magicae from the likes of . . .

Ana Bozicevic interviewed at 3:AM Magazine

Tarpaulin Sky Press author Ana Božičević (Stars of the Night Commute, 2009) is interviewed at 3:AM Magazine: “I remember thinking I wasn’t in love with anyone at the time, so there was no real reason for me to stay. Probably the truth is I knew I wasn’t entirely “of Croatia” even then, and so I was free to go. . . . Nostalgia thinks there’s a place where there is no place, and in its honest, touching delusion it’s no different than any other lover.”

Verse reviews Ana Bozicevic’s Stars of the Night Commute

At Verse, Mary Austin Speaker reviews Ana Bozicevic’s *Stars of the Night Commute* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2009): “Although it is dangerous to make presumptions about the way one’s biography inflects their poetry, I think it’s helpful to consider the conditions of Ana Bozicevic’s native country when she left it. Croatia’s is a history of conflict in which voices speak over each other. Stars of the Night Commute, the author’s first collection of poems, suggests that since her emigration she has been learning how to write her own history while rejecting the very idea of writing history….”

Jacket reviews Ana Bozicevic’s Stars of the Night Commute

At Jacket, Nicole Mauro reviews Ana Bozicevic’s *Stars of the Night Commute* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2009): “Though Božičević’s work does terrify, and so, by extension, is rightly ‘about’ terror . . . Stars is more accurately (and happily) about what an émigré does, heart and eyes intact and hungry for the redemptive and the beautiful, after having experienced all that is contrary to the love and kindness (that can be) human beings.”

Ana Bozicevic’s Stars of the Night Commute reviewed at Transversalinflections

Transversalinflections reviews Ana Bozicevic’s *Stars of the Night Commute* “Think of the whole book and its sections and its individual poems as a snowglobe that has been shaken up, and where not snow, but objects are floating around in varying connected but wondrous configurations. . . .The poems are no longer primarily linear, but are constellations of ideas that have body and dimensions as well as being open and porous.”

U of Arizona Poetry Center reviews Ana Bozicevic’s Stars of the Night Commute

At the University of Arizona Poetry Center’s website, Bonnie Jean Michalski reviews Ana Bozicevic’s *Stars of the Night Commute* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2009): “Emoticons and screennames, curse words, “yawn, blah, blah, schma…”, ozone, yellow cab… this book includes it all. Božičević’s is not a poetry enamored of the archaic. Following in O’Hara’s footsteps, it challenges us to place the stuff of daily life under the adjective ‘poetic.'”