Trans-genre

Aaron Apps, Intersex: A Memoir

Intersex explores gender as it forms in concrete and unavoidable patterns in the material world. In this hybrid-genre memoir, intersexed author Aaron Apps adopts and upends historical descriptors of hermaphroditic bodies such as “freak of nature,” “hybrid,” “imposter,” “sexual pervert,” and “unfortunate monstrosity” in order to trace his own monstrous sex as it perversely intertwines with gender expectations and medical discourse. “Intersex is all feral prominence…. Necessarily vulnerable, brave and excessive…. Like the best kind of memoir … a book that bursts from its very frame” (BHANU KAPIL)

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Joyelle McSweeney: Salamandrine: 8 Gothics

A collection of short stories by Joyelle McSweeney, refracting the dread and isolation of contemporary life through a series of formal/generic lenses, producing a distorted, attenuated, spasmatic experience of time, as accompanies motherhood; making impossible any thinking in terms of conventional temporalities or even causalities, let alone their narrative effects. “McSweeney’s breakneck prose harnesses the throbbing pulse of language itself.” (PUBLISHERS WEEKLY); “sexy teleological apocrypha of motherhood literature, a siren song for those mothers ‘with no soul to photograph'” (BROOKLYN RAIL); “These words ring and richochet like tinnitus in your ears” (QUARTERLY WEST); “One would not make love to a Salamandrine during a sandstorm” (ALEISTER CROWLEY)

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Johannes Goransson: Haute Surveillance

“[A] feverish and explicit set of images and ideas revolving around power, fetish, porn, media, violence, translation, punishment, performance, and aesthetics….. kind of like a novelization of a movie about the production of a play based on Abu Ghraib, though with way more starlets and cocaine and semen.” (BLAKE BUTLER, VICE); “part epic poem, part science fiction, part pornographic film, and all literature” (JOHN YAU, HYPERALLERGIC); “so filled with invention and wit and ferocity that I was compelled to read it, at times against my will, mesmerized, enthralled. (CAROLE MASO)

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Kim Gek Lin Short: China Cowboy

Set in a technicolor timewarp called Hell, Hong Kong, Kim Gek Lin Short’s China Cowboy follows wannabe cowgirl La La, who is hellbent on realizing her dream to be a folk-singing sensation even as she tries to survive her kidnapper, Ren, who is just hellbent. Ren thinks he’ll win, but La La, dead or alive, always wins. “both devastating and uncomfortably enjoyable” (AMERICAN BOOK REVIEW); “a satanically intricate narrative with seemingly infinite vantage points in space, time and sympathy … a zone where elegance and grace can gambol with the just-plain-fucked-up” (HTML GIANT), “leaves one’s nerves exposed and moral fortitude shaken” (FACT-SIMILE). “Excruciatingly compelling, so infernal…in languages variously pornographic and desperately, radically tender…. A bold, imaginative, timely work from a courageous and complex thinker” (HEIDI LYNN STAPLES) “Grossly disturbing and excruciatingly seductive… Tales of fierce femme survival…. (JAI ARUN RAVINE)

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Jenny Boully: not merely because of the unknown that was stalking toward them

In not merely because of the unknown that was stalking toward them, Jenny Boully presents us with a “deliciously creepy” swan song from Wendy Darling to Peter Pan. As in her previous book [one love affair]*, Boully reads between the lines of a text—in this case J. M. Barrie’s Peter and Wendy—and emerges with the darker underside, with those sinister or subversive places merely echoed or hinted at. “[T]o delve into Boully’s work is to dive with faith from the plank — to jump, with hope and belief and a wish to see what the author has given us: a fresh, imaginative look at a tale as ageless as Peter himself.” (BOOKSLUT) “Simultaneously metaphysical and visceral, these addresses from Wendy to Peter in lyric prose are scary, sexual, and intellectually disarming.” (HUFFINGTON POST); “Jenny Boully is a deeply weird writer—in the best way.” (ANDER MONSON)

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Johannes Goransson: Entrance to a colonial pageant in which we all begin to intricate

“I don’t know where else you could contract the plague in these words but by ten TVs at once. On the TVs play: Salo, the weather channel, 2x Fassbinder (any), Family Double Dare, ads for ground beef, blurry surgical recordings, porno, porno, Anger (all)…. You’ll need a machine gun and a body double…. Burroughs and Genet and ‘Pac are dead. Long live Goransson” (BLAKE BUTLER); “a discomfiting, filthy, hilarious, and ecstatic piece of literature that is cocked and ready” (BOOKSLUT); “Page after page begins to infect the reader, begins to parasite the reader as host, parasite the host’s inner child … before immolating the host, the reader” (PANK MAG); “a pile up of sequined things and fleshy things…. The audience is often implicated. After all, torture and interrogation is not borne out of individual will and action alone…. All aboard” (HTML GIANT)

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Sarah Goldstein: Fables

Departing from the Brothers Grimm to approach our own economically and socially fractured present, Fables constructs a world defined by small betrayals, transformations, and brutality amid its animal and human inhabitants. Goldstein weaves together familiar and contemporary allegories creating a series of vibrant, and vital, tales for our time. “Goldstein’s vision and approach is wholly new. Her work in this collection is more than translation and transcription: Fables contains poems that whisper tradition but fully stand on their own.” (THE IOWA REVIEW); “Horrifying and humbling in their imaginative precision” (THE RUMPUS); “In the meadow of fairy tale, Goldstein unrolls ribbons of story that fly gamely and snap with brilliance.” (DEB OLIN UNFERTH)

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Kim Gek Lin Short: The Bugging Watch and Other Exhibits

The Bugging Watch & Other Exhibits is the prose elegy of a boy who wants to be a bug in order to save by symbiosis the dead girl he loves. Enacted in prose poems and cross-referenced datebooks, the inseparable lovers eternally rehearse for a real life together, repeating in that instant between being and nonbeing, the loss into which their love escaped. “beguiling and entirely enthralling” (ART + CULTURE); “An opiate trip . . . terrifying, ungraspable . . . sad and beautiful” (NEW PAGES); “Irresistible!” (NORMA COLE); “Do not read this book at night” (BHANU KAPIL); “This small unsettling book . . . both conceals and reveals its morbidity, its twisted thirsts” (JOYELLE MCSWEENEY); “Valentines . . . cut from thick, mealy-colored childhood stock. Here is language as enchantment” (SELAH SATERSTROM)

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Joyelle McSweeney: Nylund, the Sarcographer

Acclaimed poet Joyelle McSweeney’s first novel, Nylund the Sarcographer (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007) is a something like a baroque noir: “Campy-cum-lyrical post-Ashberyan prose…. Language dissolves into stream-of-consanguinity post-surrealism and then resolves into a plot again…. Recommended” (STEPHEN BURT); “Nylund is like interesting on steroids…. If you are looking for a typical, straight forward, good old fashioned yarn, you’d do best to look elsewhere; but if you want to experience something fresh, daring, creepy, and significant, this is the one for you” (BOOKSLUT); “a masterful redefinition of what constitutes prose…. A character who is the very embodiment of writing” (NEWPAGES); “Welcome to fiction’s new femme fatale, Joyelle McSweeney” (KATE BERNHEIMER)

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