TS Press News

NewPages reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s Nylund, the Sarcographer

At NewPages, Cynthia Reeser reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s *Nylund, the Sarcographer* (Tarpaulin Sky Press): “Joyelle McSweeney has not only created a unique concept – that of sarcography – she has illustrated it memorably with a masterful redefinition of what constitutes prose, and created a character who is the very embodiment of writing, reminding us of how flexible the narrative form can be.”

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Figures for a Darkroom Voice, a staff pick, reviewed at Powell's

At Powell’s, staffer Alexis Smith reviews *Figures for a Darkroom Voice*, from Noah Eli Gordon and Joshua Marie Wilkinson (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “These aren’t just two guys with three names each; these are two of the poets to watch in the next generation…. What started as an experiment in poetics, passing a pad of paper back and forth across a cafe table, ended as one of the most interesting books of last year…. With whimsical drawings by Noah Saterstrom, and published by the always stellar Tarpaulin Sky Press.”

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At Harriet, Stephen Burt reviews Joyelle McSweeney's Nylund, the Sarcographer

At the Poetry Foundation’s Harriet, Stephen Burt reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s *Nylund, the Sarcographer* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “Flights of campy-cum-lyrical post-Ashberyan prose…. The Daisy parts are actually sexy, the murder-mystery parts and the furniture-store bits are genuinely funny, the language dissolves into stream-of-consanguinity post-surrealism and then resolves into a plot again…. It’s recommended”

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Coldfront reviews Figures for a Darkroom Voice

At Coldfront, Mike McDonough reviews *Figures for a Darkroom Voice* by Noah Eli Gordon & Joshua Marie Wilkinson (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “Figures in a Darkroom Voice reads as searching, musical whole. Gordon and Wilkinson produce a voice that turns over new territory without sounding boring, mechanical or self-indulgent. There is somehow a gentle good sense to nearly every strange line they write. You feel like if you read this book carefully enough, you would see that it is actually an instruction manual for living a good life, one that only works if you fall asleep while reading it. You feel like you could invite both of them to dinner, and they wouldn’t embarrass you or your family, except that they would have to wear nametags so you could tell them apart. What could be bad about that?”

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Coldfront reviews Danielle Dutton’s Attempts at a Life

At Coldfront, Jason Schneiderman “struggles” to review Danielle Dutton’s *Attempts at a Life* (Tarpaulin Sky Press): “I would want to claim these pieces firmly as prose poems—in large part because of the way that poetry has become the big tent where everything that doesn’t fit somewhere else is welcome…. Dutton is certainly at home in a theoretical universe—one could discuss many of these poems—and quite profitably, I think—in terms of contemporary literary theory. However, Dutton’s work is incredibly inviting—she’s able to inhabit the insights of theory and then perform them without having to get bogged down in the sort of jargon or explanation that might deter the general reader (whoever you are). Dutton’s work is “accessible” in the best way possible. She’s working at a remarkably high level of insight while still inviting you to enjoy yourself.”

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Joyelle McSweeney interviewed at Prick of the Spindle

At Prick of the Spindle, Cynthia Reeser interviews Joyelle McSweeney (*Nylund, the Sarcographer*, Tarpaulin Sky Press): “Once you put the sarcography in motion as a matter of writing, then anything can happen, because the sentence can always open up trapdoors and catwalks via its clauses and phrases and puns and jokes and fantasies and so forth. In fact, the one rule I had when writing this was not to use good taste or understatement or comely resonance at all, but just to follow all my stray ideas, at the level of the sentence, to keep it opening, twinning, diverging, dividing. I used more conventional aspects of noir—a dead woman, a missing woman, a young hood, an (elderly) femme fatale—as sort of course correction as the book ran along.”

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Bookslut reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s Nylund, the Sarcographer

At Bookslut, Christopher Higgs reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s *Nylund, the Sarcographer*: “Nylund, the Sarcographer is like interesting on steroids. Caution: if you are looking for a typical, straight forward, good old fashioned yarn, you’d do best to look elsewhere; but if you want to experience something fresh, daring, creepy, and significant, this is the one for you. It is the opposite of boring, an ominous conflagration devouring the bland terrain of conventional realism, the kind of work that tickles your inner ear, gives you the shivers, and tricks your left brain into thinking that your right brain has staged a coup d’état….Other than the incomparable Ben Marcus, I’m not sure anyone in contemporary letters can compete with the voracity of ingenuity, complexity, and beauty of McSweeney’s usage.”

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Rain Taxi reviews Danielle Dutton’s Attempts at a Life

At Rain Taxi, Peter Connors reviews Danielle Dutton’s *Attempts at a Life* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “In section after section in Attempts at a Life, Danielle Dutton executes expert, miniscule language slips that make us slide down the surface of her narratives like raindrops streaking the windows of the last un-gentrified house in an old Victorian neighborhood…. It most certainly introduces an important new literary voice.”

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