TS Press News

Bookslut reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s Nylund, the Sarcographer

At Bookslut, Christopher Higgs reviews Joyelle McSweeney’s *Nylund, the Sarcographer*: “Nylund, the Sarcographer is like interesting on steroids. Caution: if you are looking for a typical, straight forward, good old fashioned yarn, you’d do best to look elsewhere; but if you want to experience something fresh, daring, creepy, and significant, this is the one for you. It is the opposite of boring, an ominous conflagration devouring the bland terrain of conventional realism, the kind of work that tickles your inner ear, gives you the shivers, and tricks your left brain into thinking that your right brain has staged a coup d’état….Other than the incomparable Ben Marcus, I’m not sure anyone in contemporary letters can compete with the voracity of ingenuity, complexity, and beauty of McSweeney’s usage.”

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Rain Taxi reviews Danielle Dutton’s Attempts at a Life

At Rain Taxi, Peter Connors reviews Danielle Dutton’s *Attempts at a Life* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “In section after section in Attempts at a Life, Danielle Dutton executes expert, miniscule language slips that make us slide down the surface of her narratives like raindrops streaking the windows of the last un-gentrified house in an old Victorian neighborhood…. It most certainly introduces an important new literary voice.”

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Danielle Dutton’s Attempts at a Life reviewed at dogmatika

At dogmatika, Kristina Marie Darling reviews Danielle Dutton’s *Attempts at a Life* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “In her debut collection, Attempts at a Life, Danielle Dutton combines floral umbrellas with strange dreams, the English countryside, and Virginia Woolf…. Written in a lyrical style that borders on the poetic, the works in Attempts at a Life question such literary conventions, frequently manipulating reader’s expectations while at the same time scrutinizing them…. Attempts at a Life is a compelling, enigmatic read. Ideal for readers of the fiction and the literary essay alike, Danielle Dutton’s new book is a significant contribution to contemporary experimental writing. Five stars.”

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Review of Contemporary Fiction reviews Danielle Dutton’s Attempts at a Life

In The Review of Contemporary Fiction, Kate Zambreno reviews Danielle Dutton’s *Attempts at a Life*: “The stories often read like curious abstract puzzles, and one should resist running to the bookshelves to attempt to break the code. The best pieces call to mind that of Gertrude Stein or Diane Williams, both obvious influences on Dutton whose lines she also pastiches, with a voice that comes off as refreshingly eccentric, as in the title story, a collection of nine fragmented first-person biographies. She also reimagines the lives of famous heroines from literature, from Hester Prynne to Virginia Woolf’s Mary Carmichael in A Room of One’s Own to Alice James to Madame Bovary. Her glorious version of Jane Eyre reads like one of The Guardian’s congested reads as reimagined by Gertrude Stein or Jane Bowles.”

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Bookslut reviews Max Winter’s The Pictures

At Booklslut, Olivia Cronk reviews Max Winter’s *The Pictures* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “[The Pictures] knows how to please; its breathy moments of profundity are tempered by an evenly handled attention to the landscape of the imagination. Max Winter, also a poetry editor at the endlessly hip Fence, is generous in his willingness to make toy-like the reader’s experience while uncompromising in his specificity….. And this, I must tell you, is inherently fun to read.”

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Bookslut interviews Danielle Dutton

At Bookslut, Angela Stubbs interviews Danielle Dutton, author of *Attempts at a Life* (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2007): “Another odd thing that Christian noticed is that I tend to hyphenate words that don’t need to be hyphenated because they are just two separate words that a normal person wouldn’t hyphenate or they’re actually one word that doesn’t need a hyphen. Christian had an interesting theory about it, that maybe it has to do with how close I am to texts that are a century (or more) old. There’s a lot of rabid hyphenating going on in those books. Now I see that I do it all the time. I’m constantly asking myself, “Does this need a hyphen? What am I doing?” It’s like a sickness.”

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